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张晶 Zhang Jing: 隐山梦谈 第三卷 In tiefen Wäldern Träumen lauschen - Band 3 ("Talking about dreams in deep mountains", German language edition)<br>ISBN:978-3-905816-89-1, 9783905816891
张晶 Zhang Jing: 隐山梦谈 第三卷 In tiefen Wäldern Träumen lauschen - Band 3 ("Talking about dreams in deep mountains", German language edition)
ISBN:978-3-905816-89-1, 9783905816891

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Shen Congwen: Xiangxi sanji / Recollections of West Hunan (bilingual English-Chinese)

ISBN: 978-7-5447-0930-9, 9787544709309
[48.1412]
7.25EUR


Titel: Shen Congwen: Xiangxi sanji / Recollections of West Hunan (zweisprachig Chinesisch-Englisch) - 沈从文: 湘西散记 (汉英对照)
Author / Editor: 沈从文 Shen Congwen (著 Autor), 杨宪益 Yang Xianyi, 戴乃迭 Dai Naidie (译 Übersetzer)
ISBN: 978-7-5447-0930-9, 9787544709309
Series: 新课标双语文库 xin kebiao shuangyu wenku
Publisher: Yilin Press - 译林出版社
Language: bilingual Chinese-English
Date of Publication: 2009.07
First edition
Number of pages: 311
Dimensions: 15,1 x 22,9 cm
Binding: Paperback


Description:

Author’s Preface

This volume of my early essays comprises eleven chosen from four collections written between 1932 and 1937, a time when I was maturing as a writer and was at the height of my powers.
The first section comes from the first two chapters of my autobiography completed between the summer and autumn of 1932. I was then teaching composition in the Chinese Department of Qingdao University in Shandong. I lived in a small, newly repaired bungalow at the corner of Fushan Road, between the college and the park…
Though the life was lonely I did not find it irksome, as I felt my vital forces burgeoning, waiting to flower and be put to use. In such conditions, I finished my autobiography within three weeks, and without waiting to make another copy sent the manuscript straight off to my Shanghai publisher. The first section deals with my life as a mischievous schoolboy. Judged by conventional standards, all I learned was how to play truant; but as I see it, I was trying to find ways to dodge the feudal educational system designed to turn me into a “careerist”, and to escape into the new, fresher world of Nature, in which by making full use of my senses I could have a different type of education. Of course my family and school did not recognize my method of self-education, and thought me disobedient, lazy and hopeless. From my point of view, the future they had mapped out for me was a dead end. So while still a boy I left home and went out to a totally strange society to make a living. For five years I received a rigorous education along the thousand li of the Yuan River Valley, living from hand to mouth as a poor vagrant and meeting with some fantastic experiences. I saw hundreds of my fellow countrymen and friends die futile deaths, and was lucky to come through alive myself. But instead of being disheartened and losing faith in life, I felt I had read a big book with immensely rich contents which increased my useful knowledge and taught me the true significance of life, convincing me of the road I ought to take. Under no circumstances would I grow decadent when life seemed without hope, nor would I preen myself on some minor achievement. This education and experience encouraged me to come to Beijing empty-handed when I was twenty, to read a new, larger book; it also fired my childish imagination with the ambition to achieve something more worthwhile after ten or twenty years of additional study. In this way I make it my principle to act on my own judgement, never relying on favours granted by others or trusting to luck, nor affected by temporary ups and downs in my work. I went on studying like this for twenty-five years.
The second section of this book consists of four essays chosen from my reminiscences of west Hunan. These were based on letters to my home in Beijing during the winter of 1933 when I went back to visit my old district for a month. Later I re-edited and rewrote these letters. At first sight these essays may strike readers as commonplace travelogues describing scenery and miscellaneous incidents; but actually they touched on more complex problems than many of my short stories. In 1933 I left Qingdao University to work in Beijing; and after my marriage there in September that year my life underwent a radical change. We then lived in a detached house inside Xi’an Gate. …
Each early morning I worked on my story “The Border Town” there….
But before its completion, towards the end of November, I received a letter from my old home saying that my mother was seriously ill and wanted me to go back. At that time Chiang Kai-shek had mobilized six hundred thousand troops in Jiangxi to attack Ruijin, and the raging battles were causing tens of thousands of casualties. In Hunan the local troops were waging small-scale warfare with forces from Guizhou over the opium tax; thus the situation there was rather tense too. The highway was cut. The journey there and back by boat would take more than one month, and it would be more convenient to travel alone. So I arranged with my wife that I would note down all that happened on the way and post those notes back to her. The weather had turned cold and the rivers were low. I took a boat upstream from Taoyuan in the lower reaches of the Yuan, stopping from time to time. It took me twenty-two days to reach Pushi in the middle reaches of the river. Then I travelled on foot for three days through the mountains before finally reaching my hometown – Fenghuang. During my boat journey, I sat watching the flowing river all day long and felt very lonely. The villages along the river looked quiet, but actually where was tension in the air, and anytime disaster might strike. Life was very insecure …
Though this slender volume of essays appears to be a travelogue written at random without much editing, each contains allusions to events and personal feelings which a careful reader can easily detect. I wrote about various wharves along the Yuan and insignificant, everyday incidents – the joys and sorrows, successes and failures of boatmen on small junks and their past and present. But what was difficult to express was the pathos of this, and their anxiety about their fate. Even their low standard of living was hard to maintain. They were liable to be crushed by external forces, and their common fate was to come to a sad end. …
… then Chiang Kai-shek’s soldiers came in as conquerors and ravaged the countryside. …
The four essays in the third section were chosen from my book West Hunan, written in the winter of 1937. After the War of Resistance Against Japan broke out and Beijing fell to the invaders,…
For twenty years west Hunan had been considered as “bandit area” because it would not obey the Nanjing government. It was also thought to be shrouded in mystery. …
I wrote this book as a systematic introduction to west Hunan, including the people and economy of the Yuan River Valley with its five tributaries, focussing on Yuanling and Fenghuang and describing in detail the good and bad points of both places. I hoped in this way to counter certain erroneous ideas by making a more objective analysis of some of the fantastic legends created by outsiders and attributed to these parts. …
The fourth section may be described as fictionalized reminiscences based on real incidents. I wrote six of these, of which three have been chosen. When I went back to Fenghuang in the winter of 1920, I was invited by a friend to attend a wedding in a village called Gaoxian about forty-five li from the county town, and these essays describe incidents which occurred there. There were less than two hundred families in this village, of which the Mans were the largest. Simple-minded and impulsive, they became involved in a quarrel over nothing of great consequence with a family called Tian, and the outcome was truly tragic. Several dozen people died because of this and the feud continued for two generations. The main protagonist and his only child were killed by their enemies. …
The essays were based on incidents I witnessed myself…
Rereading these four collections of essays, what strikes me as strange is that although written at different times, which different backgrounds and feelings, they share one common characteristic. All are permeated with a local idyllic atmosphere tinged with loneliness and sadness, as if I grieved over many of the people and events I described….



About the author

Shen Congwen (traditional Chinese: 沈從文; simplified Chinese: 沈从文; pinyin: Shěn Cóngwén; Wade-Giles: Shen Ts'ung-wen, December 281902—May 10, 1988) was the pen name of a Miao Chinese writer from the May Fourth Movement. He was known for combining the vernacular style of writing with classical Chinese writing techniques, and his writing also reflects a strong influence from western literature. He was born as Shen Yuehuan (沈岳煥) on 1902 December 28 in Fenghuang County (凤凰县) in Hunan Province. He died on 1988 May 10 in Beijing. He is described as "a novelist, short-story writer, lyricist and passionate champion of literary and intellectual independence.... Although almost entirely unknown to Western readers, Mr. Shen's oeuvre, much of it embued with the folklore and customs of his native western Hunan, has been compared to that of William Faulkner."

Shen was initially trained for a career in the military. As a soldier in the Chinese army, he observed border fighting and the lives of the Miao tribesmen, which would later become the subject matter of his early short fiction stories. He began writing fiction in 1922 and wrote almost continually until 1949. He taught Chinese literature at various universities during the Second Sino-Japanese War out of monetary necessity.

Originally an apolitical writer, he suffered a breakdown after the Communist Revolution in 1949 and the subsequent restrictions on writing. He recovered by 1955, but he never again published another work of fiction. He was given a staffing post at the Palace Museum at the Forbidden City in Beijing, about which he wrote a non-fiction work in 1957. Afterwards, he also published a famous study of Chinese costume and dress.

Changhe (长河, “The Long River”), written during the Sino-Japanese War, is generally considered the best of his long fiction. Chundeng Ji (春灯集, “Lamp of Spring”) and Heifeng Ji (黑凤集, “Black Phoenix”) are his most important collections of short stories.

(Wikipedia)




书摘 Excerpt from the book

  十五年以前,我有机会独坐一只小篷船,沿辰河上行,停船在箱子岩脚下。一列青黛色崭峭的石壁,夹江高矗,被夕阳烘炙成为一个五彩屏障。

  Fifteen years ago I chanced to charter a little boat with a bamboo canopy to sail up the River Chen. We stopped at the foot of Chest Precipice. The river here was flanked by looming black cliffs irradiated by the setting sun into a prismatic screen.



目次 Table of Contents


Author's Preface
作者序……………………………………………………………………………………………………
I Study a Small Book and at the Same Time a Big Book
我读一本小书同时又读一本大书………………………………………………………………………
While Continuing My Schooling I Stick to That Big Book
我上许多课仍然不放下那一本大书……………………………………………………………………
A Night at Mallard-Nest Village
鸭窠围的夜………………………………………………………………………………………………
An Amorous Boatman and an Amorous Woman
一个多情水手与一个多情妇人…………………………………………………………………………
Chest Precipice
箱子岩……………………………………………………………………………………………………
Five Army Officers and a Miner
五个军官与一个煤矿工人………………………………………………………………………………
The People of Yuanling
沅陵的人…………………………………………………………………………………………………
Fenghuang
凤 凰……………………………………………………………………………………………………
After Snow
雪 晴……………………………………………………………………………………………………
Qiaoxiu and Dongsheng
巧秀和冬生………………………………………………………………………………………………
Truth Is Stranger than Fiction
传奇不奇…………………………………………………………………………………………………

This product was added to our catalog on Samstag 20 Februar, 2010.
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